Download Exploring Ambiguos Harmony PDF

TitleExploring Ambiguos Harmony
File Size2.5 MB
Total Pages39
Document Text Contents
Page 1


 

BAJP – Year 4 
Written Analysis Project 

 
 
 

Exploring 
Ambiguous Harmony 

With Triadic Slash Chords 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Mathias Baumann

Page 2


 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

“The sonority of a constant triad over a root is stark 
 

and sometimes creates missing note, non‐modal chords, 
 

but has a desired beauty because of its transparency.” 
 
 

Ron Miller, Modal Composition & Harmony – Volume 1

Page 19

19 
 

Analysis Of Melodies And Solos 
 
This  chapter depicts examples of  solo or melody excerpts which utilize  slash  chords. The 
selection  is focused on ambiguous sounding chords with the objective to disclose different 
possible sonorities. 
 

Example 1: Sleep (Ben Monder – Dust)                       

‰ CD Track 02 
 
Melody, Bars 12‐14, Excerpt ~ 0’23’’ – 0’33’’ 
 
 

 
 
 

In bars 12 and 14, Ben Monder  states F
maj7(9/11)

 as  the  chord  symbol  to describe  the  full 

sound of the chord in conjunction with the melody. The actual chord he is playing, though is 
E
sus4

/F which is VII
sus4

/I, implying an F
maj7(#11)

 sound. In the solo section he reduces the chord 

symbol to F
maj7(#11)

. Here is what he is playing over it: 

 
Solo, Bars 65‐72, Excerpt ~ 2’55’’ – 3’07’’ 
 
In bars 65‐66, 69‐70 and 98‐99 he uses an F Lydian scale sound which conforms with  the 
primary choice for this chord type. 
 



 
 
6  Solo transcribed by Jeremy Poparad, http://www.poparad.com 

= E
sus4

/F                                                                                          = E
sus4

/F 

                         F Lydian                                                                                                           F Lydian   

                         F Lydian                                                                                                            

VII
sus4

/I                                                                                        VII
sus4

/I

Page 20

20 
 

Solo, Bars 92‐99, Excerpt ~ 3’41’’ – 3’54’’ 
 
Whereas  in  bars  94‐95  he  bases  his  line  on  the  F Messiaen Mode  7 which  supports  the 

F
maj7(9/11)

 sound he used  in bars 12 and 14 of  the melody.  In my master class about slash 

chord sounds with him, he mentioned that he explored Messiaen’s modes for a while which 
supports the assumption of the applied scale. 
 

    7 

 
 
Solo, Bars 60‐61, Excerpt ~ 2’45’’ – 2’50’’ 
 
 

      8 

 

Over  II/I  in bar 60 he clearly thinks of an Emaj7 chord played over  its maj7th  in the bass. On 
the  down  beats  he  uses  long  notes  featuring  the  root  note  E  and  the major  3

rd
 G#.  He 

continues with an E
maj7(#5) 

arpeggio  in bar 61 over a  III/I  chord. Again primary  sounds are 

preferred. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7/8  Solo transcribed by Jeremy Poparad, http://www.poparad.com 

             E Lydian                           E
maj7(#5)

 Arpeggio   

             F Messiaen Mode 7  

             F Lydian   

     bII/I                                   III/I

Page 38

38 
 

4) The  bass  note  could  provide  three  chord  tones which  interweave with  the  upper 
structure  chord.  You  are  basically  creating  a  polychordal  sound  out  of  a  simple 
hybrid chord. 
Examples: 
 

Chord  Triad Based On The Bass Note  Resulting Scale 

F/G  G   B   D  F   G   A   B   C    D   F 
B

7
/D  D   F   A  B   D   D   F    F  A   A   B 

 
 

5) Adding one note to a triadic hybrid chord results in a pentatonic scale. If the hybrid 
chord includes a tension the resulting scale becomes hexatonic. 
Examples: 
 

Chord  Added Note  Resulting Scale 

F/G  D  F    G   A    C    D    F 
B

7
/D  C  B   C     D   D   F   A   B 

 
The new generated scales could then serve as a harmonic universe to compose with or to 
use for improvisation.

Page 39

39 
 

Conclusion 
 
Coming back to the main two questions from the start of this essay it becomes evident that 
not  all  slash  chords have  specific  sounds.  Some  chords  sound  very open  and  ambiguous. 
Especially in a modal setting the improviser has many options to resort to. 
 
Consequently I have illustrated various sound possibilities for all triadic slash chords in form 
of a condensed table which can be found in appendix 1 on the Data CD. 
 
Although this essay focuses on the analysis of harmonic aspects, one should not forget that 
“harmony alone does not define music.” 

16
  

 
 

Further Reading And Bibliography 
 

 Patterns For Jazz by Jerry Coker 
 A Chromatic Approach To Jazz Harmony And Melody by David Liebman 
 The Chord Scale Theory & Jazz Harmony by Barry Nettles And Richard Graf 
 Modal Composition & Harmony – Volume 1 by Ron Miller 
 Lydian Chromatic Concept Of Tonal Organisation – Volume 1 by George Russell 
 Jazz Composition Theory And Practice by Ted Pease 
 Harmony 4 by Steve Rochinski, Berklee 
 Harmony 4 by Alex Ulanowski, Berklee 
 Neue Jazz Harmonielehre by Frank Sikora 
 The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine 
 Jazzology – The Encyclopedia Of Jazz Theory For All Musicians by Robert Rawlins & 

Nor Eddine Bahha 
 The Jazz Language – A Theory Text For Composition And Improvisation by Dan Haerle 
 The Advancing Guitarist by Mick Goodrick 
 Survival Guitar by Peter Fishers 
 Jazz Guitar Structures – Boosting Your Solo Power by Andrew Green 
 This Is Your Brain On Music by Daniel Levitin 
 Neue Allgemeine Musiklehre by Christoph Hempel 
 www.musicteachers.co.uk 
 www.music.sc.edu/ea/jazz/theroy/scalecat.pdf 
 www.nestorcrespo.com.ar 
 www.scales‐chords.com 
 www.poparad.com 
 www.opus28.co.uk/jazzarticles.html by Jason Lyon 
 Master Class with Ben Monder (20/12/2012) 
 Master Class with Jim Mullen (24/01/2013) 

 
 
 
 
16  Modal Composition & Harmony – Volume 1 by Ron Miller

Similer Documents