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TitleMandate Politics
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size1.4 MB
Total Pages226
Table of Contents
                            Cover
Half-title
Title
Copyright
Contents
List of Figures
List of Tables
Preface
Acknowledgments
1 A Single Time in a Single Place
	1.0.1 “Our Enemy is Time” – Budget Politics and the Reagan Revolution
	1.0.2 “We Heard America Shouting” – The End of Welfare as We Know It
		1.1 MANDATES AS SOCIAL CONSTRUCTIONS
		1.2 THE STUDY OF MANDATES
			1.2.1 Institutional Perspectives
			1.2.2 Behavioral Perspectives: What the Voting Tradition Really Says about Mandates
		1.3 TELLING THE LARGER STORY OF MANDATE POLITICS
2 The Evolution of Mandates
	2.1 THE MEDIA SPIN: ON THE DECLARATION OF MANDATES
		2.1.1 Social Construction of Electoral Mandates
		2.1.2 Spin, Counterspin, and Consensus
	2.2 BEFORE THE ELECTION
	2.3 ELECTION NIGHT
		2.3.1 Size of the Win
		2.3.2 Blindsiding
		2.3.3 Three Election Nights
		2.3.4 The Filter of TV Commentary
	2.4 THE BUILDUP TO TAKING OFFICE
		2.4.1 Explanation Dynamics
3 Members of Congress Respond
	3.1 MANDATED CONGRESSES?
		3.1.1 A Model of Member Response
		3.1.2 Reconstructing Mandates
		3.1.3 1965
		3.1.4 1981
		3.1.5 1995
		3.1.6 A Reconstructed Mandate
		3.1.7 Mandate Dynamic and Mandate Response
	3.2 SETTING UP A TEST
		3.2.1 Observing Reactions to Mandates
		3.2.2 Coding Examples
	3.3 MODELING MANDATES
		3.3.1 Modeling Individual Behavior
	3.4 WHO RESPONDS TO MANDATES?
	3.5 DURATION OF MANDATES
		3.5.1 Individual Members and the Mandate Duration
		3.5.2 Explaining the Different Durations
	3.6 MEMBERS AND THE MANDATE SIGNAL
4 The Pattern of Congressional Response
	4.1 CONGRESS IN THE AGGREGATE
		4.1.1 1965
		4.1.2 1981
		4.1.3 1995
	4.2 PIVOTAL POLITICS
		4.2.1 Notes on Pivotal Politics Theory
		4.2.2 Static Effects: Changing Personnel
		4.2.3 Dynamic Effects: Changing the Message
	4.3 MOVEMENT BACK TOWARD EQUILIBRIUM: A LONGER VIEW
		4.3.1 Measures
		4.3.2 Modeling Equilibration
5 Consequences
	5.1 INSTITUTIONAL POLITICS
		5.1.1 Why Change Rules?
		5.1.2 1965: Rules for a Great Society
		5.1.3 1981: A Revolution Without a Majority
		5.1.4 1995: Preparing to Pass the Contract
		5.1.5 Mandates and Study of Institutional Change
	5.2 TURNING THE MANDATE OFF
		5.2.1 The Great Society of 1964–1965
		5.2.2 The Reagan Revolution of 1980–1981
		5.2.3 The Contract with America, 1994–1995
		5.2.4 A Validity Check
	5.3 MANDATES AND THE FLOW OF PUBLIC POLICY
	5.4 APPENDIX
6 The Irresistible Meets the Unmovable
	6.1 THE RETURN TO NORMAL POLITICS
		6.1.1 The Tide Turns
	6.2 THE SUBSEQUENT ELECTION
		6.2.1 First-Term Members
		6.2.2 Representation or Retaliation: Mandates Two Years Later
		6.2.3 Retirements
		6.2.4 Election Results: Is Mandate Response Rewarded?
		6.2.5 Voters and Mandate Reactions
7 Conclusion: A Mandate View of Normal American Politics
	7.1 THE 2004 MANDATE?
		7.1.1 The Evidence of Election Night
	7.2 THINKING ABOUT NORMAL
	7.3 THE EFFICIENCY OF DEMOCRACY
		7.3.1 The Underappreciated Status Quo
	7.4 DRAMATIC BEGINNINGS
	7.5 ELECTIONS IN AMERICA: A REINTERPRETATION
		7.5.1 The Rational Expectations Perspective
	7.6 THE DEMOCRATIC DILEMMA OF MANDATES
		7.6.1 Normative Concern Squared with Empirical Evidence
Bibliography
Index
                        

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