Download Monsterhearts 2 PDF

TitleMonsterhearts 2
TagsLeisure
File Size2.3 MB
Total Pages175
Table of Contents
                            Chapter 1: How The Game Works
Chapter 2: Preparing to Play
Chapter 3: Keeping Your Heart Safe
Chapter 4: MCing
Chapter 5: The Skins
	The Fae
	The Ghost
	The Ghoul
	The Hollow
	The Infernal
	The Mortal
	The Queen
	The Vampire
	The Werewolf
	The Witch
Chapter 6: Making It Your Own
Chapter 7: Taking Inspiration
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Monsterhearts
 2 

Monsterhearts
 2 

Monsterhearts
 2 

Page 2

Credits
Dedicated to Jackson Tegu and R. K. Mooney

Writing and design by Avery Alder
Writing contributions on race and racism by Ciel Sainte-Marie,
James Mendez Hodes, and Jeeyon Shim

Editing by Daniel Wood
Cover illustration by Cecilia Reis
Interior art by Avery Alder
With endless support from Jackson Tegu

Powered by the Apocalypse World engine, by D. Vincent Baker
and Meguey Baker.

With design support from Ross Cowman and Luke Jordan.
The new rules for gaining experience borrowed from Dungeon
World, by Sage LaTorra and Adam Koebel.

Titles in Yataghan, body in Fontin and Fontin Sans. 2017.

For more visit www.buriedwithoutceremony.com/monsterhearts

http://www.buriedwithoutceremony.com/monsterhearts
http://apocalypse-world.com

Page 87

87

Give everyone a messy life
You’ve got all these characters to play - the members
of the football team, the guardians and siblings of
the monster teens, teachers, librarians, others. It’s
important to remember that when these characters are
off-screen they don’t just power down or go on stand-
by. They’re off living their lives. That means that they’re
sleeping around, stealing money from one another,
snooping into matters that don’t concern them, and all
the other things that people do.

You don’t need to chart out the days of all of your
various characters. But every once in a while, ask
yourself what they might be up to. If it’s been a session
since you saw Jeremy, wonder what mischief he might
have gotten into. Occasionally, surprise the other
players by reminding them that every character that
touches the fiction has a vibrant and messy life going
on, even if we don’t usually see it.

Find the catch
When acceptance is offered between two people, look
for clues that it might be lopsided or conditional. When
one of your side characters offers someone a gift, make
sure there’s a twist, or a debt to be repaid. When a
character is happy, think about who might be unhappy
because of the same things. Salina’s relationship with
Jackson might seem blissful and secure, but Rocko’s in
the shadows brooding over it. How far would he go to
get her back? Find the Rocko in every situation. Then,
use your questions and your choice of scenes to draw
attention to the catch. Find out which of these catches
people are willing to overlook, and which will force
their hand.

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88


C

h
. 4

:
M

C
in

g

Ask provocative questions and build on the
answers
Ask questions all the time. Ask questions in order to
build up sensory details (“What does your room smell
like?”). Ask questions in order to reveal perspectives
(“So, what do you think about this bush party?”).
Ask questions to highlight potential story directions
(“Have you and Lorna ever hooked up? Have you ever
thought about the possibility?”). Ask questions to
reveal insecurities and fears (“Why don’t you want to
sneak back into Jake’s place?”). Ask questions to reveal
sources of tension (“He’s never seen you with a girl, but
Brandon keeps calling you a dyke. Why?”)

Whatever answer you get, trust it and build upon
it. Add your own details to the answers that players
give, and incorporate whatever they say into future
descriptions. If someone answers a question with
something provocative and interesting, maybe even
something that changes the game, go with it. Let
their answers steer the story in new and unexpected
directions. Ask questions in the hope that you’ll be
surprised by what you hear. This is part of how you
keep the story feral.

Be a fan of the main characters
You share the same agenda as everyone else: make each
main character’s life not boring. As the MC, that often
means introducing struggle and adversity into their
lives. Just remember that your goal is not to thwart
them, or to gain some sort of unspoken power over
them. The whole reason you’re introducing struggle
and adversity is to see how they change under pressure,
to watch their brilliance and flaws bubbling up, and
to enjoy their story. You’re not here to coddle these
characters or to bully them. You’re here to be their fan.

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174

 Index
A
Advancement 34

Gangs 35
Agenda 9–12

B
Backstory 69
Basic Moves. See Moves
C
Conditions 31–33
Conventions 106

D
Darkest Self 45–46
Death 30

E
Examples of Play 7, 17, 19, 29, 32, 33, 79, 98, 112, 168–171
Experience 34

F
Forward 31
Future Sessions 110

G
Gangs 35

H
Hacking 156–166
Harm 27
Healing 28–29
High School 7, 38, 44, 70–71, 157

I
Identity 62

M
Materials 58, 60, 154
MC Role 59, 84
Media Homework 172
Modifying the Game 156–166
Moves 14–15, 66–67, 160–161

Gaze Into The Abyss 24
Growing Up Moves 54–56
Healing 28–29

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175

Keep Your Cool 21Lash Out Physically 22
Pulling Strings 26–27
Run Away 23
Shut Someone Down 20
Skirting Death 30
Turn Someone On 18–19

O
One-Shots 106

P
Principles 85–90

Q
Queerness. See Sexuality
R
Race 40–43
Reactions 92–98
Roleplaying 8, 65
Rolling Dice. See Moves
S
Safety 60, 74–82
Scene Framing 13, 103–105, 107
Seasons 51–52, 110

Season Advances 53–56
Seating Charts 70–71, 102
Setting 60, 63–64, 108–109
Sexuality 18–19, 36–37, 48, 49
Side Characters 99–101
Skins 61, 162–165

Identity 62
Small Towns 60
Strings 16–17, 26–27, 66, 100–101

T
Teaching 59–71
Texting 50

V
Villains 111–112
Violence 22, 27, 47

X
X-Card 60, 78

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