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Page 1

Oral Communication
in Context

For Senior High School

All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means -
electronic or mechanical including photocopying – without written permission from the DepEd Central Office. First Edition, 2016.

Page 2

C & E
Publishing, Inc.

C & E Publishing, Inc. was
established in 1993 and is a

member of ABAP, PBAI, NBDB,
and PEPA.

Oral Communication in Context
For Senior High School
Published in 2016 by C & E Publishing, Inc.
839 EDSA, South Triangle, Quezon City
Tel. No.: (02) 929-5088
e-mail: [email protected]

Copyright © 2016 by C & E Publishing, Inc., Philippe John Fresnillo
Sipacio and Anne Richie Garcia Balgos

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced,
stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by
any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or
otherwise—without the prior written permission of the publisher.

Cover Design: Victor C. Joaquin
Illustrations: Kenneth G. Sabay
Francis P. Salipande
Layout: Francis A. Casupanan

ISBN 978-971-98-0449-9

All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means -
electronic or mechanical including photocopying – without written permission from the DepEd Central Office. First Edition, 2016.

Page 95

89

2

In the administration of public affairs, all men entrusted with authority must
adhere firmly to the ideals and principles of the Constitution.

I will render – and demand – uncompromising loyalty to the basic tenet of our
Constitution; that you, the people, are sovereign. The rule of government must be
of service to you.

Accordingly, I pledge my administration to your service. I pledge that we
shall extend the protection of the law to everyone, fairly and impartially – to the
rich and the poor, the learned and the unlettered – recognizing no party but the
nation, no family but the great family of our race, no interest save the common
welfare.

The Bill of Rights shall be for me, and the members of my administration, a
bill of duties. We shall be guardians of the freedom and dignity of the individual.

More than this, we shall strive to give meaning and substance to the liberties
guaranteed by our Constitution – by helping our citizens to attain the economic
well-being so essential to the enjoyment of civil and political rights.

The separation of powers ordained by our Constitution – as an effective
safeguard against tyranny – shall be preserved zealously. Mutual respect for the
rights and prerogative of each of the three great departments of government
must be observed. […]

Heretofore, social justice has raised fervent but frustrated hopes in the hearts
of our less fortunate citizens. We must not permit social justice to be an empty
phrase in our Constitution. We must bring it to life for all.

In consonance with this purpose, my administration shall take positive,
energetic measures to improve the living conditions of our fellow citizens in the
barrios and neglected rural areas and of laborers in our urban and industrial
centers. […]

3

Democracy becomes meaningless if it fails to satisfy the primary needs of the
common man, if it cannot give him freedom from fear on which a strong republic
can be built. His happiness and security are the only foundations on which a
strong republic can be built. His happiness and security shall be foremost among
the goals of my administration.

We must develop the national economy so that it may better satisfy the
material needs of our people. The benefits of any economic or industrial
development program shall be channeled first to our common people, so that
their living standards shall be raised.

While I shall give priority to our domestic problems, my administration will
not neglect our international responsibilities. We cannot escape the fact that,
today, the destinies of nations are closely linked. It is in this spirit that we regard
the goodwill and assistance extended to us through the various programs of
international economic cooperation with the more developed nations.

All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means -
electronic or mechanical including photocopying – without written permission from the DepEd Central Office. First Edition, 2016.

Page 96

90

It is to our common interest that this Republic, a monument to mutual goodwill
and common labor, should prove to the world the vitality of the democracy by
which we live.

We shall continue to cooperate with the United Nations in seeking collective
security and a just world peace.

To our Asian brothers, we send our fraternal greetings. They are beset by
problems of the same nature and complexity as those that confront us. We
invite them to share our experience in finding solutions to those problems
through democratic means. It is my hope that we can exchange experiences and
information on methods that each of us has found most effective in subduing
illiteracy, poverty, disease, under-productivity, and other common evils which have
afflicted our countries of past generations.

4

The problems and opportunities ahead of us set the measure of the effort
we must exert in the years to come. We must have unity to solve our problems,
cooperation to exploit our opportunities. I urge you to forego partisan differences
whenever the national interest clearly demands united action. We must not be
distracted from our work. We have no time for petty strife.

I have been warned that too much is expected of this administration, that our
people expect the impossible. For this young and vigorous nation of ours, nothing
is really impossible!

Let us have faith in ourselves, the same faith that fired the heroic generation
of revolution. They waged and won their struggle with nothing but bolos in their
hands and courage in their hearts. Without political training and experience, they
wrote a constitution comparable with the best and established the first republic
in Asia. Our own generation was told by doubters and enemies that we would
never have independence from the United States. We live today under a free and
sovereign Republic. Our faith was fulfilled.

Today, we are told anew that it is impossible to do what must be done. But
our people, sustained by God, under whose protection we have placed our destiny
and happiness, and strengthened by an abiding faith in His goodness and mercy –
our people, united and free – shall shape a future worthy of our noble heritage if
we but act; act together; act wisely; act with courage; and act unselfishly, in a spirit
of patriotic dedication.

Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines. (December 1953). Inaugural Address of President
Magsaysay, December 30, 1953.

All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means -
electronic or mechanical including photocopying – without written permission from the DepEd Central Office. First Edition, 2016.

Page 190

184

feedback, 4-6, 9

message, 4-6, 9

receiver, 4-5, 9

speaker, 4-6, 9

emotional appeal, 167

encoding (see elements of communication)

entertainment speech, 63, 80, 135, 137-142

expressive (see speech acts)

extemporaneous speech, 80, 82, 88-90, 126, 128-
133

fallacy, 166-167

ad hominem, 166-167

circular argument, 166-167

false analogy, 166-167

false authority, 166-167

false cause and effect, 167

hasty generalization, 167

red herring, 167

false analogy (see fallacy)

false authority (see fallacy)

false cause and effect (see fallacy)

feedback (see elements of communication)

formal (see speech styles)

frozen (see speech styles)

hasty generalization (see fallacy)

illocutionary act (see speech acts)

impromptu speech, 80-82, 116, 118, 121-125

bridging strategy, 119

opening, rule of three, clincher strategy,
119

past, present, future strategy, 118-119

playing devil’s advocate strategy, 120

point-reason-example/explanation-point
strategy, 119

reframing strategy, 120

indirect speech act (see speech acts)

informative speech, 63, 80, 144, 151-155

speech about concepts, 147

speech about events, 147

speech about objects or people, 146

speech about processes, 147

intercultural communication, 19-20, 22-27

interpersonal communication (see speech
contexts)

intimate (see speech styles)

intrapersonal communication (see speech
contexts)

locutionary act (see speech acts)

manuscript speech, 81-82, 88-90, 94, 96-107

mass communication (see speech contexts)

memorized speech, 81-82, 88-90, 111-115

message (see elements of communication)

models of communication

Shannon-Weaver Model, 5-6, 9

Transaction Model, 6, 9

Monroe’s Motivated Sequence (see
organizational patterns)

nomination (see communicative strategies)

nonverbal communication, 10, 11-12

organizational patterns

chronological pattern, 148, 151-152

spatial/topical/categorical pattern, 148,
151-152

cause-effect pattern, 150-152

comparison-contrast, 151-152

A.F.O.R.E.S.T., 161

problem-solution, 161

problem-cause-solution, 162

comparative advantages, 162

Monroe’s Motivated Sequence, 163-164

performatives (see speech acts)

perlocutionary act (see speech acts)

persuasive speech, 63, 80, 104-106, 156-159,
165-170

All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means -
electronic or mechanical including photocopying – without written permission from the DepEd Central Office. First Edition, 2016.

Page 191

185

speech that questions fact, 159

speech that questions policy, 160

speech that questions value, 159-160

speech that refutes, 160

public communication (see speech contexts)

purpose of speech, 63-64

receiver (see elements of communication)

red herring (see fallacy)

reframing strategy (see impromptu speech)

repair (see communicative strategies)

restriction (see communicative strategies)

Shannon-Weaver Model (see models of
communication)

small group (see speech contexts)

speaker (see elements of communication)

speaking situations (see speech delivery)

speech acts, 41-43

locutionary act, 44

illocutionary act, 44

perlocutionary act, 44

indirect speech act, 44

performatives, 44

assertive, 45, 46-47

directive, 45, 46-47

commissive, 45, 46-47

expressive, 45, 46-47

declaration, 45, 46-47

speech contexts, 31-34

intrapersonal communication, 32, 34

interpersonal communication, 32, 34

dyad communication, 32, 34

small group, 33-34, 37-38

public communication, 33-34, 37

mass communication, 33-34, 37

speech delivery, 77, 79, 84-87

speaking situations, 82-84

speech editing, 67-68, 70-72

speech outline, 66, 74, 138-141

speech styles, 35-36

casual, 35, 37

consultative, 35, 39

formal, 35, 37

frozen, 35

intimate, 35

speech topic, 64, 73

speech writing, 62, 68-69, 74-76

speech writing patterns, 64-65, 74

termination (see communicative strategies)

topic control (see communicative strategies)

topic shifting (see communicative strategies)

Transaction Model (see models of
communication)

turn-taking (see communicative strategies)

verbal communication, 10

All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means -
electronic or mechanical including photocopying – without written permission from the DepEd Central Office. First Edition, 2016.

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