Download We'll Be Here For the Rest of Our Lives: A Swingin' Showbiz Saga PDF

TitleWe'll Be Here For the Rest of Our Lives: A Swingin' Showbiz Saga
Author
LanguageEnglish
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Total Pages263
Table of Contents
                            ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
PRELUDE
DYLAN AND ME
TWO JEWS’ BLUES
B3
RUNNING INTO RAY CHARLES
WITH YOUR KIND INDULGENCE…
SHAFFER A-GO-GO
DID YOU HEAR THE ONE ABOUT THE VENTRILOQUIST AND THE RABBI?
HERE I COME TO SAVE THE DAY
FRANK SINATRA WELCOMES ELVIS BACK FROM THE ARMY
SWEET, SWEET CONNIE
THE ALL-TIME GREATEST PUSSYCAT OF THE WORLD
NIGHTS IN WHITE SATIN
KEEPING NORTH AMERICA SAFE
“YOU’VE SEEN THESE, THEN?”
“WHERE ARE WE NOW?”…
BLAME CANADA
JILLY LOVES YOU MORE THAN YOU WILL KNOW
“LOVE’S THEME”
“WHICH OF THESE COFFEES IS THE FRESHER?”
A BLACK CASHMERE COAT WITH A RED SILK LINING
HOLLYWOOD SWINGING
THE BRADY BUNCH, THE OHIO PLAYERS, AND MR. CHEVY CHASE
PAUL AT THE GRAMERCY
CATHERINE VASAPOLI
THE BLUES BROTHERS!
DIVIDED SOUL
KING OF HAWAIIAN ENTERTAINMENT
THE HEALING POWERS OF MR. BLACKWELL
HOW BLUE CAN YOU GET?
THE CALL THAT CHANGED IT ALL
BLUES, BROTHER
I’M NO HOMOPHOBE, OR HOW I CAME TO CO-WRITE “IT’S RAINING MEN”
THE GIG OF GIGS
MY ELVIS
LOVING GILDA
“KICK MY ASS—PLEASE!”
TAKE MY LIMO, PLEASE
VIVA SHAF VEGAS
MEL GIBSON AND THE JEWS
ON THE NIGHT SHIFT
BAD TASTE
FAMILY IS EVERYTHING
WHAT KIND OF HOST AM I?
THE GRINCH WHO RUINED CHRISTMAS
PATRIOTISM AND RELIGION
CREDITS
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 131

other hosts included Richard Pryor, Dick Cavett, Lily Tomlin, Robert Klein, and
Buck Henry. Musical guests included Esther Phillips, Gil-Scott Heron, Carly
Simon, Bill Withers, and Al Jarreau.
I collaborated on a song with one of the writers, Marilyn Miller, who spoke to

Lorne about giving me a weekly credit. Because I was doing some composing,
the traditional acknowledgment might have been “special musical material
by…” But the word at was always “That’s too Carol Burnett,” meaning
something smacked of an old-school variety show. “Special musical material”
smacked of old school. Instead, I thought of those lounge lizard pianists who
liked to say, “You’ve been listening to the musical stylings of…” and, given

and my own fondness for kitsch, I suggested to Lorne that my credit read,
“Musical stylings by Paul Shaffer.”
When it appeared on the screen, though, my mother called from Canada and

said, “It sounds like you’re doing their hair.”
So my credit became “Special musical material by Paul Shaffer.”
Whatever the handle, it was all exhilarating stuff. And what could be more

exhilarating than being present when the Rolling Stones came on? I was in their
first skit, appearing as Don Kirshner, who wants to get backstage to see them.
Belushi plays their bouncer and is determined to keep me out. “You’re cut,” he
says. “You’re not on the list.” But the Kirshner character manages to sneak in
and hang out with the bad boys of rock and roll. There I am, acting with Keith,
Ronnie, and Charlie. Cool.
The problem, though, was that Lorne, overstimulated by the appearance of the

Stones on his show, lost track of time. Something had to go.
I was in makeup, applying the final touches of the Palm Springs Kirshner tan,

when Mick popped in and spoke to me—Paul Shaffer—for the first time in his
life.
“You’re cut,” he said.
“Cut?” I asked.
“Lorne’s shit-canned Kirshner. You’re out.”
I didn’t care. Mick Jagger had spoken to me.

Outside of Studio 8H, New York night life was jumping. I was surrounded by
funky stuff. The funkiest soul band since James Brown was called Stuff. They
played four nights a week at Mikell’s, close to my little Upper West Side pad. I

Page 132

never missed a night. It was soul heaven. This was the group that consisted of
pianist Richard Tee, guitarists Cornell Dupree and Eric Gale, and drummers
Steve Gadd and Chris Parker. The leader was bassist Gordon Edwards. This was
the same group that appeared on the second show of the second season of
backing up Joe Cocker. While doing “Feeling All Right,” Joe was joined onstage
by Belushi doing Joe. The Cocker-off was a classic. You couldn’t tell if John was
mocking Joe—or if it was Joe mocking John mocking Joe. Either way, it was a
beautiful mockery and I was blessed to be there.
Who in their right minds would want to leave

“I think you should leave, Paul,” said Norman Lear. “You’d be making a mistake
if you didn’t.”
Lear had been the host of the second show of second season. After the

show, he came up to me and gave his pitch.
“We sold the pilot of to CBS,” he said. “We can’t do it without you,

Paul. We don’t want to do it without you. What do you say?”
What does anyone say to Norman Lear?

.
I had my doubts. I loved my New York life. I was playing dates in the studios

with everyone from Barry Manilow to Burt Bacharach. I was in demand. I was
developing special material with the kids on , and I’d been put in some of
the sketches. I was loving it.
But then I thought to myself: Wasn’t it cosmic synchronicity that Norman

Lear was hosting that very week? Wasn’t he there just to tell me that the
time was right to tackle Hollywood? And when he said that I’d not only be in a
hit TV sitcom, but I’d also be in a band destined to top the charts, who could
resist that argument? Who could resist being bigger than the Monkees?
Scardino could; he was out. I couldn’t; I was in.
I met with Lorne and told him about Lear.
“Paul,” he said, “I think you should reconsider. We want you, we need you,

we love you. We need to work something out. What will you be making in
L.A.?”
“I start at fifteen hundred an episode.”
“We’re going to miss you.”

Page 262

Copyright © 2009 by Paul Shaffer Enterprises, Inc.

All rights reserved. Published in the United States by Doubleday/Flying Dolphin Press, an imprint of
Random House, Inc., New York, and in Canada by Random House of Canada Limited, Toronto.

FLYING DOLPHIN PRESS is a registered trademark of Random House, Inc.

www.doubleday.com

Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following for permission to reprint previously published and
unpublished material: Paul Anka: Excerpt from “My Way” parody by Paul Anka. Reprinted by permission
of Paul Anka.

Brew Music: Excerpt from “We’re An American Band” by Don Brewer, copyright © 1987 by Brew Music.
All rights reserved. Reprinted by permission of Brew Music.
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CATALOGING-IN-PUBLICATION DATA

Shaffer, Paul,
We’ll be here for the rest of our lives / by Paul Shaffer with David
Ritz. — 1st ed.
p. cm.
1. Shaffer, Paul. 2. Conductors (Music)—United States—Biography. 3. Musicians—United States—
Biography. 4. Late night with David Letterman (Television program) I. Ritz, David. II. Title.
ML422.S48A3 2009
784.092—dc22
[B]
2009005484

eISBN: 978-0-385-53221-1

http://www.doubleday.com

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